CONFERENCE POSTPONED

𝐍𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐒𝐞𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐅𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞: Powered by People
In light of recent developments surrounding COVID-19 – and mindful of the health and safety of the Australian National Security community and the critical role it continues to play in protecting Australians – the College has made the decision to postpone the inaugural National Security Futures Conference. Ticket-holders will receive a full refund. Notwithstanding, we are totally committed to our mission of futures analysis capacity-building across Australian Government and beyond. The emergence of COVID-19 reinforces the pressing need for multidisciplinary analysis of future trends, plausible national shocks and the policy options surrounding them. Therefore, in the coming months the NSC will proudly launch an online experience that will help us deliver against this mission. Drawing on the talent and insights we have discovered while developing the conference, and in keeping with its theme of Powered by People, this digital product will look forward into the next decade to shine a light on the nexus between the social realm and key national security issues. This exciting new project will enable you to engage with the new ideas and concepts slated for the conference when and where it suits you. I encourage you to register your interest below, so we can alert you to updates as they happen. For all enquiries, please contact national.security.college@anu.edu.au Thank you for your understanding – please stay safe and well. Professor Rory Medcalf Head, The National Security College
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Schedule

  • 01 April
  • 02 April

Registration

08:00 AM 09:00 AM

Welcome to Country

08:30 AM 08:45 AM

Opening remarks: Chancellor The Hon. Julie Bishop

08:45 AM 08:55 AM

The Hon Julie Bishop

Opening remarks: Professor Rory Medcalf

08:55 AM 09:00 AM

Rory Medcalf

Opening keynote: To be announced

09:00 AM 10:00 AM

Panel: Democracy 2030

09:20 AM 10:50 AM

Meera Ashar

Kath Gleeson

Toomas Hendrik Ilves

Dino Patti Djalal

Morning Tea

10:50 AM 11:20 AM

Panel: Authoritarianism 2030

11:20 AM 12:50 PM

Samantha  Hoffman

Raihan Ismail

Richard McGregor

Tom Nichols

Greg Raymond

Lunch

12:50 PM 01:50 PM

Keynote address: Nanjala Nyabola

01:50 PM 02:20 PM

Nanjala Nayabola

Panel: The Future of Dissent

02:20 PM 03:50 PM

Louisa Lim

Nanjala Nayabola

Ramesh Thakur

Afternoon Tea

03:50 PM 04:15 PM

Panel: The Future of Identity

04:15 PM 05:30 PM

Ben Bland

Wesa Chau

Sam Roggeveen

Tim Watts MP

Transfer to dinner venue

05:30 PM 06:30 PM

Dinner keynote: GEN James Clapper, introduced by Caroline Millar

06:30 PM 10:00 PM

James  Clapper

Keynote address: Tom Nichols

09:00 AM 10:00 AM

Tom Nichols

Panel: Public Opinion and Knowledge

09:30 AM 11:00 AM

Prue Clarke

Peter Greste

Anne Kruger

Chris  Zappone

Morning Tea

11:00 AM 11:30 AM

Panel: Technology, Culture and Power

11:30 AM 12:50 PM

Kate Henne

Alastair MacGibbon

Katherine Mansted

Zac Rogers

Lunch

12:50 PM 01:50 PM

Keynote address: Toomas Hendrik Ilves

01:50 PM 02:20 PM

Toomas Hendrik Ilves

Panel: Australia 2030 - Resilience & Social Cohesion

02:20 PM 03:50 PM

John Birmingham

Fiona McKenzie

Afternoon Tea

03:50 PM 04:20 PM

Keynote address: To be announced

04:20 PM 05:00 PM

Closing remarks: Professor Rory Medcalf

05:00 PM 05:15 PM

Speakers

Toomas Hendrik Ilves

Former President of Estonia - Digital Freedom and Democracy Campaigner
Toomas Hendrik Ilves is the former President of Estonia and an ANU Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Visitor. Ilves was elected president of the Republic of Estonia in 2006 and was re-elected for a second term in office in 2011. During his presidency, Ilves was appointed to serve in several high positions in the field of ICT in the European Union. He served as chairman of the EU Task Force on eHealth and was chairman of the European Cloud Partnership Steering Board at the invitation of the European Commission. In 2013 he chaired the High-Level Panel on Global Internet Cooperation and Governance Mechanisms convened by ICANN. From 2014 to 2015 Ilves was the co-chair of the advisory panel of the World Bank's World Development Report 2016 "Digital Dividends" and was also the chair of World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Cyber Security beginning in June 2014.

Since 2016, Ilves co-chairs The World Economic Forum working group The Global Futures Council on Blockchain Technology. In 2017 Ilves became an advisory council member of German Marshall Fund’s Alliance for Securing Democracy. The same year, he joined Stanford University as a Bernard and Susan Liautaud Visiting Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. Ilves has published many essays and articles in Estonian and English on numerous topics ranging from Estonian language, history, and literature to global foreign and security policy and cyber security. His books include essay collections in Estonian, Finnish, Latvian, Hungarian, and Russian.


01 April

02 April

James Clapper

Former Director of US National Intelligence, NSC Futures Council
National Security College Futures Council member and ANU Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Visitor, The Honorable James R. Clapper, served as the fourth US Director of National Intelligence (DNI) from 2010 to 2017. In this position, Mr Clapper led the United States Intelligence Community and served as the principal intelligence advisor to President Barack Obama. Prior to becoming the Director of National Intelligence, Mr Clapper served in two Administrations as the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence. Mr Clapper retired in 1995 after a distinguished 32-year career in the US Armed Forces. After a career in the private sector, he returned to the government two days after 9/11 as the first civilian director of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), transforming it into the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) as it is today. Mr Clapper’s awards include three National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medals, two Defense Distinguished Service Medals, the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, the Coast Guard’s Distinguished Public Service Award, three Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Awards, the Presidentially-conferred National Security Medal, and many other US civilian and military, as well as foreign government awards and decorations.

01 April

Nanjala Nayabola

Writer, humanitarian advocate and political analyst
Nanjala Nyabola is an independent researcher, writer and political analyst based in Nairobi, Kenya. Her work focuses on the intersection between technology and politics, as well as on crisis and post-crisis transitions. She is the author of "Digital Democracy, Analogue Politics: How the Internet Era is Transforming Politics in Kenya" and the co-editor of "Where Women Are: Gender and the 2017 General Election in Kenya". In addition to numerous academic papers and chapters in edited collections, her work has also appeared in numerous publications including the Financial Times, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Al Jazeera, The Guardian, the New Internationalist and others. She holds a BA in African Studies and Political Science from the University of Birmingham (UK), an MSc in Forced Migration and an MSc in African Studies, both from the University of Oxford which she attended as a Rhodes Scholar, and a JD from Harvard Law School.

01 April

01 April

Tom Nichols

US Naval War College
Author, Death of Expertise
Tom Nichols is a US Naval War College University Professor, and an adjunct at the US Air Force School of Strategic Force Studies and the Harvard Extension School. He is a specialist on Russian affairs, nuclear strategy, NATO issues, and a nationally-known commentator on US politics and national security. He is the author of the widely-acclaimed book Death of Expertise: The Campaign against Established Knowledge and Why it Matters. Dr Nichols was a staff member in the United States Senate, a fellow at CSIS and the Harvard Kennedy School, and previously taught at Dartmouth, La Salle, and Georgetown. He is also a five-time undefeated 'Jeopardy!' champion, and was noted in the 'Jeopardy!' Hall of Fame after his 1994 appearances as one of the all-time best players of the game.

01 April

02 April

Dino Patti Djalal

Founder
Foriegn Policy Community of Indonesia and former Deputy Foreign Minister of Indonesia
Previously, he was a career diplomat and ambassador, best selling author, accomplished academic, youth activist, and leader of the Indonesian diaspora community. He earned his Bachelor's Degree in Political Science from Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada); a Masters Degree in Political Science from Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada), and a Phd in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science (London, UK). In 2004, when President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono began his term, Dino Patti Djalal was appointed Special Staff of the President for International Affairs. From 2010 to 2013, Dino served as Indonesia's ambassador to the United States. In June 2014, Dino was appointed Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs, until October that year. He has founded the Foreign Policy Community of Indonesia (FPCI), which now has become the largest foreign policy group in the country, with over 90,000 people in FPCI network.

01 April

Prue Clarke

Judith Nielsen Institute for Journalism & Ideas
Prue Clarke is an award-winning journalist and media development specialist whose reporting and commentary from six continents have appeared in the Washington Post, the Guardian, the New York Times, Foreign Policy, and the BBC. Prue's reporting has won a national Edward R. Murrow award in the U.S. and the U.N. World Gold Medal among other prizes. Prue led BBC radio programming in west Africa during the 2014 Ebola crisis and co-founded New Narratives, an NGO that has raised more than $3m for investigative journalism in Africa. Prue won the 2014 Advance Global Award for Social Innovation for her work with New Narratives. Prue was an associate professor at the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York from 2009 to 2012 and director of the International Reporting program from 2015-2018. She started her career as a cadet in the ABC Sydney television newsroom and later joined the New York bureau of the Financial Times. Prue covered the 9/11 attacks from NYC's World Trade Center for the ABC. She returns to Australia to take up her role at the Institute after 19 years in New York, London and west Africa. Prue holds a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and was an "International Fellow" at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs.

02 April

John Birmingham

Author, futurist, NSC Futures Council
National Security College Futures Council member John Birmingham is an author and columnist and a former researcher for the Department of Defence. His novels have been set as recommended reading at ADFA and he has consulted for the Army’s Force Development Group. He has written two quarterly essays on Australian defence and foreign policy and contributed to Australian Foreign Affairs. He has an interest in engaging the general public with issues of strategic policy.

02 April

Peter Greste

Media freedom campaigner
UQ Professor
Professor Peter Greste is an award-winning foreign correspondent who spent 25 years working for the BBC, Reuters and Al Jazeera in some of the world’s most volatile places. From Afghanistan, to Latin American, Africa and the Middle East, he reported from the frontlines and beyond, although he is best known for becoming a headline himself, when he and two of his colleagues were arrested in Cairo while working for Al Jazeera, and charged with terrorism offences. In letters smuggled from prison, he described the arrests as an attack on media freedom. The letters helped launch a global campaign that eventually got them released after more than 400 days in prison. He has since become a vocal campaigner for media freedom – a stance that has earned him awards from Britain’s Royal Television Society, the Walkley Foundation, the RSL’s ANZAC Peace Prize, the Australian Human Rights Commission’s Human Rights Medal, and the International Association of Press Clubs’ Freedom of Speech Award. He has written about his experiences in Egypt and what he regards as the global war on journalism in a book, The First Casualty.

02 April

Kath Gleeson

Manager, Course Development
National Security College
Dr Kath Gleeson joined the National Security College in July 2019 on secondment from the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) where she was in charge of training and education for the agency. Areas of focus during her career include the design, development and delivery of training and learning focussed on capability building within the AEC but also internationally through the ‘Building Resources in Democracy, Governance and Elections’ (BRIDGE) Program. She also performed roles focused on electoral management, reform and operational delivery both in Australia and overseas, and spent time in the not-for-profit sector and in academia, where her focus was on Australian foreign policy and political theory. Kath holds a PhD in Politics and International Relations from the University of New South Wales and a Bachelor and Arts (Honours) from the University of Newcastle.

01 April

Samantha Hoffman

Non-Resident Fellow
Australian Strategic Policy Institute
Dr Samantha Hoffman is a Non-Resident Fellow at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s International Cyber Policy Centre and independent consultant. Her research is focused on Chinese state security policy and social management. She holds a PhD in Politics and International Relations from the University of Nottingham (2017), an MSc in Modern Chinese Studies from the University of Oxford (2011), and BA degrees in International Affairs and East Asian Languages and Cultures from the Florida State University (2010).

01 April

Raihan Ismail

Senior Lecturer
ANU Centre for Arab and Middle Eastern Studies
Dr Raihan Ismail is an ARC DECRA fellow and a senior lecturer at the Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, ANU. Her research interests include Islam, Political Islam, Sunni-Shia relations, women in Islam, and Middle East politics. She has presented at the Centre for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University, examining Saudi clerics and Sunni-Shia relations in the Middle East, the Crawford Australian Leadership Forum 'Global Realities', discussing challenges and opportunities for the Middle East, the Canberra Writers Festival, examining the geopolitics of the Middle East, as well as other academic and non-academic events. Since 2015, Raihan has co-convened the Political Islam seminar series for various Commonwealth government agencies, including the Attorney-General’s Department and the Department of Defence.

01 April

Alastair MacGibbon

Chief Strategy Officer
CyberCX
Alastair MacGibbon is the Chief Strategy Officer at CyberCX, former head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre at the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) and former Special Adviser to the Prime Minister on Cyber Security. In these roles, he drove the creation and strengthening of partnerships between Australian Governments, private sector, non-governmental organisations and academia to deliver national cyber security capacity and capability. MacGibbon was Australia's first eSafety Commissioner. Before that he worked for 15 years as an Agent with the Australian Federal Police, including as founding Director of the Australian High Tech Crime Centre. Along with private sector roles such as Senior Director of Trust, Safety and Customer Support at eBay, MacGibbon was a Director of the Centre for Internet Safety at the University of Canberra.

02 April

Tim Watts MP

Shadow Assistant Minister for Communications & Cybersecurity
Tim Watts MP is the author of the 2019 book The Golden Country: Australia's Changing Identity, and has been the Federal Member for Gellibrand in Melbourne’s west since 2013. Before entering Parliament, Tim worked in the Australian telecommunications and IT sectors for the better part of a decade. Tim has a Masters of Science from the London School of Economics, a Masters of Public Policy and Management from Monash University and a Bachelor of Laws from Bond University.

01 April

Chris Zappone

Digital Foreign Editor
The Age and Sydney Morning Herald
National Security College Futures Council member Chris Zappone is Digital Foreign Editor at The Age and Sydney Morning Herald. He was among the first in the media to report on the Kremlin’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 US election, and has presented on related subjects at SXSW in the US and testified to Parliament on the political risk of social media manipulation. Chris writes about the interplay between technology and politics, economics, ideology, US politics, space and the future. He also produces commentary and analysis on the broader challenges to democracy from the new information ecosystem.

Before working in international news, Chris reported on the economy and business at The Age and Sydney Morning Herald. He also contributed stories on Australia’s political and economic news for the Nikkei Asian Review and the Economist Intelligence Unit. Prior to The Age, Chris worked at CNN Money and Fortune.

02 April

Zac Rogers

Research Leader, Jeff Bleich Centre for US Alliance in Digital Technology, Security and Governance
Flinders University
Dr Zac Rogers PhD is Research Lead at the Jeff Bleich Centre for the US Alliance in Digital Technology, Security, and Governance at Flinders University of South Australia. His research combines a traditional grounding in national security, intelligence, and defence with emerging fields of social cybersecurity, digital anthropology, and democratic resilience. Currently lead researcher in a fully funded three year defence/academic collaborative project exploring the impact of digital transformation from infrastructure to the human/computer interface on Australia’s internal and external security, national interests, defence planning, and strategy.

02 April

Meera Ashar

Director, South Asia Research Institute
ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
Meera Ashar is a Lecturer in the School of Culture, History and Language at the Australian National University. She is also the Deputy Director of the South Asia Research Institute (SARI) and the Secretary of the South Asian Studies Association of Australia (SASAA). She has previously worked as an Assistant Professor at the City University of Hong Kong and has been an LM Singhvi Fellow at the Centre of South Asian Studies at the University of Cambridge.

01 April

Richard McGregor

Senior Fellow
Lowy Institute
Richard McGregor is an award-winning journalist and author with unrivalled experience reporting on the top-level politics and economies of east Asia, primarily China and Japan. He was the Financial Times bureau chief in Beijing and Shanghai between 2000 and 2009, and headed the Washington office for four years from 2011. Prior to joining the FT, he was the chief political correspondent and China and Japan correspondent for The Australian. He was a fellow at the Wilson Center in 2015 and a visiting scholar at the Sigur Center at George Washington University in 2016. He has lectured widely, in the United States and elsewhere, on Chinese politics and Asia.

01 April

Greg Raymond

Research Fellow
ANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre
Dr Greg Raymond is a research fellow in the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre. He is currently working on a research project looking at Thailand, the United States and China. He is also converting his PhD thesis on Thailand’s strategic culture into a book. Before joining the ANU, Greg worked extensively in Government, including in strategic and defence international policy areas of the Department of Defence.

01 April

Ramesh Thakur

Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament
ANU Crawford School of Public Policy
Professor Ramesh Thakur is Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (CNND) in the Crawford School, The Australian National University and co-Convenor of the Asia-Pacific Leadership Network for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (APLN). He was Vice Rector and Senior Vice Rector of the United Nations University (and Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations) from 1998–2007. Educated in India and Canada, he was a Professor of International Relations at the University of Otago in New Zealand and Professor and Head of the Peace Research Centre at the Australian National University, during which time he was also a consultant/adviser to the Australian and New Zealand governments on arms control, disarmament and international security issues.
He was a Commissioner and one of the principal authors of The Responsibility to Protect (2001), and Senior Adviser on Reforms and Principal Writer of the United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s second reform report (2002). He was a Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo (2007–11), Distinguished Fellow of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (2007–10) and Foundation Director of the Balsillie School of International affairs in Waterloo, Ontario.

01 April

Louisa Lim

Author and Senior Lecturer - Audio Visual Journalism
University of Melbourne

01 April

The Hon Julie Bishop

Chancellor
Australian National University

The Hon Julie Biship, Chancellor ANU, presides over the Council and plays a key role in official functions at the University, including at graduation ceremonies.



01 April

Wesa Chau

CEO
Cultural Intelligence
Wesa Chau is CEO of Cultural Intelligence, a consulting company specialised in raising the understanding of the power of cultural diversity through research, training and consulting. Her career started leading international students and has since held senior managerial and governance positions, including the appointment on the Ministerial Council for Womens’ Equality and National Foundation of Australia China Relations. In research, she explores topics ranging from cultural diversity, business, diaspora, philanthropy, diplomacy and politics.
Wesa was a fellow of the inaugural Scanlon-Swinburne Intercultural Fellowship, travelled to India and Malaysia visiting academics and government officials to better understand cultural diversity in India and Malaysia, and how the learning can be applied in Australia.


01 April

Ben Bland

Director, Southeast Asia Program
Lowy Institute
Ben Bland is the director of the Southeast Asia Program at the Lowy Institute. He sets the Institute’s research agenda for this important region, commissioning analysis papers and organising programs of events and visiting fellows. Ben’s personal research interests span politics, economics and diplomacy across Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam, as well as China’s growing role in the region. Before joining the Lowy Institute, Ben was an award-winning foreign correspondent for the Financial Times, with postings in Hanoi, Hong Kong and Jakarta and experience reporting across China and Southeast Asia over the previous decade. His first book - Generation HK: Seeking Identity in China’s Shadow – was published in 2017, examining the growing tensions between Hong Kong and Beijing. He has an MA in Southeast Asian Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London and an undergraduate degree in History from the University of Cambridge.

01 April

Sam Roggeveen

Director, International Security Program
Lowy Institute
Sam Roggeveen is Director of the Lowy Institute’s International Security Program, and a Visiting Fellow at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Australian National University. Before joining the Lowy Institute, Sam was a senior strategic analyst in Australia’s peak intelligence agency, the Office of National Assessments, where his work dealt mainly with nuclear strategy and arms control, ballistic-missile defence, North Asian strategic affairs, and WMD terrorism. Sam also worked on arms control policy in Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs, and as an analyst in the Defence Intelligence Organisation.

01 April

Anne Kruger

A/Co-Director, Centre for Media Transition
University of Technology Sydney
First Draft Bureau Chief, based at UTS, Sydney. Anne Kruger has over twenty years media experience throughout Asia and Australia as an anchor, editorial leader and academic. She directed online news verification projects in Asia in conjunction with Google News Labs partners, and consults for UNESCO. Anne's industry experience includes successful anchoring and reporting roles at CNN International, Bloomberg TV, and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Anne was an Assistant Professor of Practice and Head of Broadcast at the University of Hong Kong. Anne returned home as a Chief of Staff for ABC Queensland before being invited to launch First Draft in Asia Pacific.

02 April

Kate Henne

Director, School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet)
ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
Professor Kathryn (Kate) Henne is the Director of the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet). She earned her PhD in Criminology, Law and Society (with emphases in Critical Theory and Feminist Studies and a specialisation in Anthropologies of Medicine, Science and Technology) from the University of California, Irvine. Before commencing as RegNet’s Director, she held the Canada Research Chair in Biogovernance, Law and Society at the University of Waterloo and an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award at RegNet.

02 April

Fiona McKenzie

Founder and Director
Orange compass
Dr Fiona McKenzie is a human geographer with a PhD on innovation and expertise in both public policy and academic research. She is the Founder and Director of Orange Compass, a consultancy dedicated to supporting change makers on their journey to transform systems and build better futures. In addition, Fiona works with Collaboration for Impact as a Network Member where she led the creation of Australia’s first digital knowledge and learning hub for systems change and collaboration, Platform C. Prior to this, Fiona was the Co-Founder and Director of Strategy for the Australian Futures Project, where she led the design and implementation of a range of unique programs including ‘social innovation labs’ on early childhood development and agriculture. Fiona is respected for her ability to rapidly synthesise complex topics for decision makers and co-design systems change processes with stakeholders. She has more than 15 years of experience working with a range of academic, corporate, government, non-government, and intergovernmental organisations. This includes organisations such as the Dusseldorp Forum, National Australia Bank, United Nations Environment Programme, Terrestrial Carbon Group, Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research and numerous government and non-government agencies in Australia and internationally. Fiona is an Honorary Associate in the School of Geosciences at the University of Sydney, a member of Rural Bank’s Agribusiness Advisory Committee and a member of the Reference Group for the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal’s Investing in Rural Community Futures initiative.

02 April

Rory Medcalf

Head of College
ANU, National Security College
Professor Rory Medcalf has been Head of the National Security College at the Australian National University since January 2015. He has led the expansion of the College into policy engagement as well as education, executive development and research. His professional background involves more than two decades of experience across diplomacy, intelligence analysis, think tanks and journalism, including a formative role as Director of the International Security Program at the Lowy Institute.
In government, Professor Medcalf worked as a senior strategic analyst with the Office of National Assessments, Canberra’s peak intelligence analysis agency. He was also an Australian diplomat, with wide experience including a posting to New Delhi, a secondment to the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, truce monitoring after the civil conflict in Bougainville and policy development on Asian security institutions. He has contributed to three landmark reports on nuclear arms control: the 1996 Canberra Commission, 1999 Tokyo Forum and 2009 International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament. His earlier work in journalism was commended in Australia’s leading media awards, the Walkleys.

01 April

Katherine Mansted

Senior Advisor, Public Policy
ANU National Security College
Katherine Mansted is the Senior Adviser for Public Policy at the National Security College, and works across the public policy engagement and executive education functions of the College.
She is also a non-resident fellow at Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs, lectures in cyber-security and international relations at Bond University, and co-hosts the National Security Podcast on PolicyForum.net.
Katherine’s professional background includes work in both law and government. She has practiced as a commercial solicitor with Chinese-Australian law firm King & Wood Mallesons, served a judge’s associate in the High Court of Australia, and worked as a ministerial adviser in the Australian Government.

02 April

Registration

08:00 AM 09:00 AM

Welcome to Country

08:30 AM 08:45 AM

Opening remarks: Chancellor The Hon. Julie Bishop

08:45 AM 08:55 AM

Speakers

Opening remarks: Professor Rory Medcalf

08:55 AM 09:00 AM

Speakers

Opening keynote: To be announced

09:00 AM 10:00 AM

Panel: Democracy 2030

09:20 AM 10:50 AM

There is nothing inevitable nor immutable about the practices and institutions of government we have today. Democracy is practiced in different ways by different states. As society and technology change over the next decade, democracy will evolve. Democracy is dynamic and resilient; but vulnerable to decay from within and interference from without. Globally, trust in governments and other institutions inside democracies – media, religious organisations, corporations – is declining. What is the future of democracy, and how do we shape it? What are democracy’s strengths, and how can we play to them?

Speakers

Morning Tea

10:50 AM 11:20 AM

Panel: Authoritarianism 2030

11:20 AM 12:50 PM

Populists, technocratic managers, state capitalists, and revisionist powers offer alternatives to liberal democracy that some find compelling. New technologies strengthen the state’s capabilities for control, while some corporate interests and ideologies see the benefits of centralised government. In the next decade, how will authoritarians deal with domestic shifts – from demographic change to automation – and transnational challenges like climate change? How might tilts to authoritarianism affect regional stability, and Australia’s national interest? What are the limits of control?

Speakers

Lunch

12:50 PM 01:50 PM

Keynote address: Nanjala Nyabola

01:50 PM 02:20 PM

Speakers

Panel: The Future of Dissent

02:20 PM 03:50 PM

Technology is continuing to transform how people organise and mobilise, but has not replaced the person on the street raising their voice, or a weapon, in defiance. From Tunisia to Hong Kong, from online to in real life, from calls for personal freedom to climate action, dissent is globalising. How will the tactics and practices of protest evolve in the coming decade? How might technology be harnessed by – or foiled – by people power? How will this impact, or inform, Australia’s interests, and the character of our region?

Speakers

Afternoon Tea

03:50 PM 04:15 PM

Panel: The Future of Identity

04:15 PM 05:30 PM

Identity has long been associated with politics and power. Today, it plays a role in Hong Kong protests and Taiwanese politics, while some argue that “identity politics” in America and elsewhere has created domestic governance challenges and is being weaponised by foreign powers. Above all of this, Australia’s evolving 21st century identity will play a vital role in shaping the interests and values that guide our strategic priorities and security choices. What trends, risks, and opportunities – here and abroad – should we be paying attention to?

Speakers

Transfer to dinner venue

05:30 PM 06:30 PM

Dinner keynote: GEN James Clapper, introduced by Caroline Millar

06:30 PM 10:00 PM Gandel Hall, National Gallery of Australia

Speakers

Keynote address: Tom Nichols

09:00 AM 10:00 AM

Speakers

Panel: Public Opinion and Knowledge

09:30 AM 11:00 AM

How will people make decisions – economic, political, social – and form beliefs and opinions in an increasingly congested and contested information environment? For over a century, the media has played an important role in translating the noise of an information-rich world into meaningful signals for the public. But media business models – and other trusted channels for information-sharing – continue to face pressure. Which information gatekeepers will we rely on in the next ten years? Who will have access to high-quality information? In a data-rich, increasingly algorithmically-ordered world, what type of information translators are most important? Why do these questions matter to national security policymakers and operators?

Speakers

Morning Tea

11:00 AM 11:30 AM

Panel: Technology, Culture and Power

11:30 AM 12:50 PM

We shape our technologies, then they shape us. Frontier information and bio technologies are cultural artefacts – the product of ideologies, assumptions, government regulation, and business models. Will these technologies reinforce or subvert existing power structures? How could they change people’s priorities, behaviours & preferences? How will answers to the perennial questions of politics – who gets what, when & how – evolve in light of technology change? And how might all of these trends affect the security landscape in the Indo-Pacific?

Speakers

Lunch

12:50 PM 01:50 PM

Keynote address: Toomas Hendrik Ilves

01:50 PM 02:20 PM

Speakers

Panel: Australia 2030 - Resilience & Social Cohesion

02:20 PM 03:50 PM

In the coming decade, where in the social realm are we most likely to find black swans, black elephants, and sources of strategic surprise? What will resilience and social cohesion look like? What will we be securing? How can national security policymakers adapt our institutions, policy, and capabilities to ensure relevance, and to positively shape our strategic environment? This panel will respond to themes raised across the Conference, and issues surfaced via an audience-led ‘Delphi process’.

Speakers

Afternoon Tea

03:50 PM 04:20 PM

Keynote address: To be announced

04:20 PM 05:00 PM

Closing remarks: Professor Rory Medcalf

05:00 PM 05:15 PM